Wednesday, August 10, 2011

It's Time to Go

Summer Evening, Edward Hopper, 1947
It was a hot summer night following the end of World War II.  A woman's voice could be heard above the call of the frogs and crickets.  "Charlie, you can't leave, it would break mama's heart.  She would be lost without you with Daddy gone."

Lauren, Charlie's sister, was trying to dissuade him from enlisting in the Army on his 18th birthday.  

"The war's over," Charlie explained.  "This is my chance to see the world, learn a trade, and make a life for myself.  Daddy would be proud."

"Daddy died in the war.  You think he'd want you running off and leaving mama and me.  To risk ending up like he did?"  Lauren was not only scared for her brother, she was angry.  Angry that he could just up and leave them.  It wasn't mama's heart that would break as much as her own.  Not only was he her brother, he was her twin and her best friend.  Losing him would be like losing half of herself.

Reading her thoughts, as he did so often, he said quietly, "Don't worry, you won't lose me.  I'll be safe.  Daddy will be watching over me.  It's time for me to go."


17 comments:

  1. A good storyline here. Thanks

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  2. Why does family life have to change so as we grow up?

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  3. Awww! I loved this, Linda. What a great interpretation of the photograph. I hate to think of Charlie off to war, but love to think of his father watching over him.

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  4. Hi Linda.
    Wow, you really captured a lot of emotion in this short piece. Great interpretation of the photo, too.

    I love this line: "A woman's voice could be heard above the call of the frogs and crickets."

    There's always been something melancholy to that sound and this discussion the two twins are having is just that. Great job.

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  5. What a stunning little story in so few words. I love this!

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  6. this was a heartbreaking and beautiful story!!!

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  7. Doctor FTSE- Thank you!

    Babs- I don't know. I guess with time we begin to see the world as adults and that's when we leave childhood behind.

    Talon- Thank you. I like to think my folks are still watching over me.

    Davina- Thank you. I never thought of that sound as melancholy, but the sound of life renewed as the seasons change. Their discussion is definitely tinged with sadness.

    Linda- Thank you so much.

    Meleah- Many thanks, I am glad you enjoyed it.

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  8. Great, era-veracious tale-telling.

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  9. WOW. With everything going on in the world today, this especially hit home. Very profound.

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  10. Hi Linda .. great story .. I can feel her fear for her brother - that great unknown .. love the comfort aspect 'Daddy will watch over me' .. Hilary

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  11. A touching scene, that fits the picture so well. Nice!

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  12. a moving piece.
    beautifully written magpie.

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  13. Linda,

    I also love how you interpreted the picture with this touching story. I could these two on the porch and the emotional struggle.

    It made me think of my dad, who was the only child. I think it was hard on his parents, when he enlisted during WWII.

    Thanks for sharing this:~)

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  14. As an identical twin myself, I know the wrench and heartache in being parted. It is like a part of your own soul that's gone.......but 20 years later and the wonder of technology, it gets easier!!

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  15. Steve Isaak- Glad you liked it. Thanks for stopping by.

    Katherine- Thanks. There may be a lot wrong with the world, but there's still a lot right, too.

    Hilary- Don't we think of them as watching over us, and hope they're proud?

    T- Thanks so much - glad you stopped by.

    Morning- Thank you, and thanks for the visit.

    Sara- Thank you. I figured there would be a lot of romantic writings, and I wanted to be different. It's never easy when someone goes off to war, then and now.

    Lena- With the aid of the internet, we can all stay closer with social networks, pictures and even video chat. I don't have any siblings, so I'm glad I could make it seem real.

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  16. Beautiful, Linda. Just beautiful. Now I want to call my brother in Vancouver, just to say hi. :-)

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  17. Hi Linda .. you're right .. I hope everyone up there is proud and understands what we're doing down here! Thanks ... families are so important .. as are friends .. Hilary

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